Photography

This page will be used to update my ideas and research to do with the upcoming photography project.

When reading the first chapter of the “Photography” book I came across many interesting facts about the history of photography which I did not know about.

The information on the daguerreotype is particularly interesting as this was the first practicable method of obtaining permanent images with a camera, founded by Louis Jacques-Mande Daguerre.

I googled some images to see what these daguerreotypes looked like as  I could not possibly imagine them. here they are:

This isn’t a daguerreotype but came up in the search..  it is definitely very intriguing and interesting nonetheless 🙂

The world’s first photograph was a sun drawing or a “heliograph” – I didn’t know this either.. so here is an image:

invented by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce-After coating a pewter plate with the same solution of bitumen of Judea, he placed the plate into a camera focused upon the sunlit scene looking out from the third-floor window of his house at Le Gras. The exposure is recorded as having been around eight hours in duration. The brightest parts of the scene bleached and hardened the bitumen. When developed in the oil of lavender and turpentine, some coating in the partly exposed middle tones and all the coating in the unexposed shadow areas, was dissolved away, revealing the dark gray metal beneath. The resulting image is therefore a direct positive: the light sections being the hardened bitumen, the darks ones being the actual pewter plate surface.

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/exhibitions/permanent/wfp/heliography.html

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